State and federal land managers, biologists, and law enforcement officials have concerns that the presence of large crowds of people currently occupying the area around Pu’uhululu

State and federal land managers, biologists, and law enforcement officials have concerns that the presence of large crowds of people currently occupying the area around Pu’uhululu on Hawai‘i Island’s Mauna Kea are having a negative impact on native plants, animals and insects.

The DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) is currently investigating the possible disappearance or destruction of the rare Hawaiian ʻānunu vine (Sicyos Macrophyllus), which was part of an extensive out-planting on State land conducted by the U.S. Army which manages threatened and endangered species in the area. In addition to the vine, five other critically endangered species of imperiled plants were stepped on. Federal officials are also concerned about access to the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge and the potential impacts to endangered Hawaiian Goose (nēnē) management efforts as the breeding season begins.

 

What:

News Conference

 

When:

Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019

9:00 a.m.

 

Where:

DLNR Division of Forestry & Wildlife, Hawai‘i Island Branch Office, 19 E. Kawaili Street, Hilo

 

Who:

  • Suzanne Case, DLNR Chair
  • Edwin Shishido, Officer, DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement
  • Lyman Perry, Botanist, DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife
  • Ian Cole, Wildlife Manager, DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife

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